go big this small

not just government reps, big govs at that
. . . no, ASK EVERYONE –

where are we ?
where do we want to go ?
so, how do we get there ?

seed: the untold story

. . . about time to hear it & tell it, this money life of ours attempting to take it all

what a story !
do get the chance to see it in full, as we just did

hottest day i’ve ever lived in

. . . thank you AL for taking us forward again

hello seattle !

this morning wifeling adele & i again with our saint-of-the-day
in robert ellsberg’s best 1995 all saints

seattle, chief of the suquamish ( 1786-1866 )

( via chief seattle’s message in power of the people,
eds robert cooney and helen michalowski )

we’re so touched. adele says, gotta call him to thank you
so right away that she does, all the way to MARYKNOLL

secretary puts him right away on. adele can’t believe it
thank you, thank you, daily-bob !

so here, what we just read, is this holy day . . .

    Seattle was born in a Suquamish village along Puget Sound, sometime around 1786. As a child he witnessed the arrival of the first whites in the Northwest. They were trappers and traders who did not come to stay. But for Seattle and his people, it was the beginning of irrevocable change.

In his early twenties, Seattle was named the chief of his tribe. By this time the early white visitors had opened the way for an ever-increasing stream of settlers. It fell to Seattle to set a strategy for dealing with these invaders and their insatiable claims. Seattle rejected the option of violent resistance and put his trust in the possibilities of peaceful dialogue. But as the full intentions of the whites became clear, his goal was reduced simply to ensuring the survival of his people.

In 1830 Seattle and many of the Indians in Puget Sound converted to Christianity. As a leader of his people he tried to integrate the principles of his faith with the beliefs of his ancestors. But with each passing year it seemed that his traditional world was growing smaller. Ultimately, Seattle came to believe that the struggle with the whites really represented the contrast between conflicting spiritual values. In particular, the Indians and the whites held to completely different understandings of the relationship between human beings and the earth.

The whites considered the land something to be bought and sold. As Seattle observed,

    How can you buy or sell the sky, the warmth of the land? The idea is strange to us … Every part of this earth is sacred to my people. Every shining pine needle, every sandy shore, every mist in the dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is holy in the memory and experience of my people … We are part of the earth and it is part of us.

In 1855 Seattle signed the Port Elliott Treaty, which trasferred ancestral Indian lands to the federal government and established a reservation for Native American tribes in the Northwest region. The alternative, he believed, was the extinction of his people. But he took the opportunity to address a letter to President Franklin Pierce. It is a haunting and prophetic document, often cited today by the proponents of ecology. It certainly does reflect Seattle’s profound ecological imagination, as well as the spiritual vision in which it was rooted:

    We know that the White Man does not understand our ways. One portion of the land is the same to him as the next,  for he is a stranger who comes in the night and takes from the land whatever he needs. The earth is not his brother, but his enemy, and when he has conquered it, he moves on.

    One thing we know, which the White Man may one day discover -our God is the same God. You may think now that you own Him as you wish to own your land; but you cannot. He is the God of humanity, and his compassion is equal for the red man and the white. The earth is precious to him, and to harm the earth is to heap contempt on its Creator … Even the white man cannot be exempt from the common destiny. We may be brothers after all. We shall see.

Chief Seattle died on June 7, 1866, on the Port Madison Reservation near the city which today bears his name.

thank you seattle ! thank you robert, robert, helen, and more
after all that, sure gotta find more . . .

here, have a look at danish manisha’s own beautiful, first music video of the same story

all began with rachel

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

silent spring here in warm winter
last night, saw it all from beginning
so much more than i ever thought

if about time, sure is here & now
( try it – if not there at her pix, try a click here – )
2-HR PBS AMERICAN EXPERIENCE SILENT SPRING

thanks again rachel

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

past these elections . . .

. . . before the flood

thanks moving-leo for reminding us
what’s going on beyond today’s voting triffles
to what’s here & ahead – planetwise

” Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he interviews individuals from every facet of society in both developing and developed nations who provide unique, impassioned and pragmatic views on what must be done today and in the future to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet. ” ( National Geographic )

hope is the thing with feathers

. . . that perches in the soul
and sings the tune without the words
and never stops at all

~ emily dickinson

sierra club daily ray of hope , 8/5/16 photo by tracey adams, atascadero, CA

sierra club daily ray of hope , 8/5/16
photo by tracey adams, atascadero, CA

panama’s indigenous using drones to save their rainforest

. . . and for these ma-pix always we’ve been needing
( from me too  . . . soon )

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation by david iaconangelo, staff christian science monitor, 6/11/16

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation
by david iaconangelo, staff
christian science monitor, 6/11/16

 

In Panama, indigenous tribes are turning to a modern tool to help protect their homes: drones.

Vast rainforests, which once covered more than half of Panama’s land surface, are shrinking – eaten away by development, both official and unofficial. Forest land is becoming mines, hydroelectric projects, farmland, cattle habitat, and the site of illegal logging.

In response, seven indigenous tribes, whose members live in autonomous zones known as comarcas, have begun sending up drones to keep an eye on their forests.

Three members from each tribe received a month of training on how to use the drones, REUTERS REPORTS. That included FLIGHT PLAN DESIGN, ASSEMBLY, MANEUVERING, and image processing, reports the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Indigenous groups are running the program in conjunction with the Panamanian environmental authority, the Rainforest Foundation, and the FAO, a UN anti-deforestation program.

The FAO believes the program will help tribes monitor watersheds, crop harvests, and forest fires by taking high-resolution images, among other data, that identify deforestation and other negative changes to forest cover.

“These tools enable us to better know the forests’ characteristics and resources we have in our territories,” said Eliseo Quintero, a representative of the Ngäbe-Buglé tribe, in a statement to Reuters.

The Ngöbe-Buglé comarca, located in the western part of Panama, is both the country’s largest comarca and one of the two most affected by deforestation, along with Darien province along the border with Colombia.

The drones have proven especially helpful in monitoring areas where manpower is limited and the rainforest is vast. Last May, NPR reported that a Peruvian conservation group was using drones TO SURVEY AND TAKE PICTURES OF A 145,000-MILE SWATH of the Amazon that had come under pressure from illegal loggers and miners.

Drones have fought deforestation another way, too: planting trees.

The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR’S KEVIN TRUONG reported in September that the group BioCarbon Engineering, led by a NASA engineer, was using drones “in the entire three-step planting method. First, using mapping software to create accurate imaging of the prospective planting area. Second, actually planting the trees. And third, going back to monitor the progress and growth of their technological handiwork.”

And it’s not a minute too soon. Panama LOSES ABOUT 50,000 ACRES (50,000 hectares) of rainforest annually, estimates ANCON, a Panamanian conservation association, while some 2 million hectares of land and water resources – an area the size of New Jersey – is degraded each year. Reforestation efforts have yielded about 75,000 hectares of secondary growth.

Deforestation hurts the economy, too. In a 2014 study, THE UN ESTIMATED that the damage to rainforest from 1999-2012 cost Panama about $3.7 million, adding that better stewardship could create jobs while producing more food and preserving watersheds and other natural resources.

Rosilena Lindo, head of the Climate Change Unit of the Ministry of Environment of Panama, called the drone monitoring system “part of our country’s commitment to address the adverse effects of climate change.”

She said the country hopes to increase the carbon absorption capacity of its forests by at least 10 percent, or more with international financial support.

choose your pedal – bikes vs cars

beautifully done in jammed up cities like sao paolo, los angeles, toronto
and some like amsterdam and copenhagen where bikes have their way