sons plenty praising her, coast-to-coast

doc reeves, doc suzuki, and us

friends john & georgia just back from canada
happily telling me of their visit to montreal’s botanical garden
email about SPACE FOR LIFE via one beautiful video
do have a look . . .

 

( CLICK IT HERE, re-click on Vimeo’s site, come back to review )

 

wonderful !
so here’s some of it, staying from hearing it all . . .

David Suzuki, Vancouver –, geneticist, science communicator, environmentalist

. . . for 99% of the time we’ve been here on earth, we knew we were a part of nature
dependent on nature, so everyone worshiped nature, called the earth our mother

all of these green things on earth that are doing this exchange for us, all of that possible because life captures the energy of the sun and gives that to us

Hubert Reeves, Montreal – , astrophysicist, science communicator

. . . we once thought of humans separate from animals, now coming to realize
yes, we’re all in the same boat

so vital of us to protect nature, not seeing to dominate it

an example is our fish: today’s fishing techniques are so difficult ( for them )
we’re taking 2x as many fish out of the water as are reproducing naturally
the question of what we’ll be eating in 30 years is a serious one

Suzuki –

. . . our move to the sixties was the fundamental break
there, our highest work is our job, to make money, to buy the things we want
economy become our highest priority
meantime, the very economy is built on the biosphere not connected to money
we forget that we here are still part of the natural world

Reeves –

. . . coming into history 100,000 years ago, people were coming out of africa
where things got harder for people protecting themselves from wild brands
no weapons, no big teeth, no fast running

except for their intelligence humans poorly equipped for life in prehistoric era
now their intelligence is working against them
once helping them survive, poor management of their intelligence
threatens human survival today

our intelligence is both blessing & curse

100,000 years ago it allowed us to survive
today it threatens us & our children

Suzuki –

. . . the most critical element: we will only save what we love
today we grow children who spend the least time outside
if “i don’t have to go outside for weeks!” how can we fish ?
or even protest for earth or ocean when we do not care !

when i go i was not able to save the world, but i want to tell my children & grandkids
i tried my best; that’s all you can do

we act today as if money & things are the most important things and they are not
it’s the relationships with other people and the things we do together

let’s stop celebrating dead people
let’s celebrate nature, stop celebrating ourselves

for my grandchildren it is a very uncertain world
that really makes me angry !

the party’s over
now we have to start

so if you care about nature
don’t worry about the planet
follow your heart !

environmentalism isn’t a specialty
it’s a way of seeing the world

fall in love with nature
get outside !
get out of your car !

electric road’s coming

. . . more than just new cars
thanks again, guardian

traffic now more than all this heat
overwhelming too here at home

as wifeling & me on the way out
mother sure on her way back

hello seattle !

this morning wifeling adele & i again with our saint-of-the-day
in robert ellsberg’s best 1995 all saints

seattle, chief of the suquamish ( 1786-1866 )

( via chief seattle’s message in power of the people,
eds robert cooney and helen michalowski )

we’re so touched. adele says, gotta call him to thank you
so right away that she does, all the way to MARYKNOLL

secretary puts him right away on. adele can’t believe it
thank you, thank you, daily-bob !

so here, what we just read, is this holy day . . .

    Seattle was born in a Suquamish village along Puget Sound, sometime around 1786. As a child he witnessed the arrival of the first whites in the Northwest. They were trappers and traders who did not come to stay. But for Seattle and his people, it was the beginning of irrevocable change.

In his early twenties, Seattle was named the chief of his tribe. By this time the early white visitors had opened the way for an ever-increasing stream of settlers. It fell to Seattle to set a strategy for dealing with these invaders and their insatiable claims. Seattle rejected the option of violent resistance and put his trust in the possibilities of peaceful dialogue. But as the full intentions of the whites became clear, his goal was reduced simply to ensuring the survival of his people.

In 1830 Seattle and many of the Indians in Puget Sound converted to Christianity. As a leader of his people he tried to integrate the principles of his faith with the beliefs of his ancestors. But with each passing year it seemed that his traditional world was growing smaller. Ultimately, Seattle came to believe that the struggle with the whites really represented the contrast between conflicting spiritual values. In particular, the Indians and the whites held to completely different understandings of the relationship between human beings and the earth.

The whites considered the land something to be bought and sold. As Seattle observed,

    How can you buy or sell the sky, the warmth of the land? The idea is strange to us … Every part of this earth is sacred to my people. Every shining pine needle, every sandy shore, every mist in the dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is holy in the memory and experience of my people … We are part of the earth and it is part of us.

In 1855 Seattle signed the Port Elliott Treaty, which trasferred ancestral Indian lands to the federal government and established a reservation for Native American tribes in the Northwest region. The alternative, he believed, was the extinction of his people. But he took the opportunity to address a letter to President Franklin Pierce. It is a haunting and prophetic document, often cited today by the proponents of ecology. It certainly does reflect Seattle’s profound ecological imagination, as well as the spiritual vision in which it was rooted:

    We know that the White Man does not understand our ways. One portion of the land is the same to him as the next,  for he is a stranger who comes in the night and takes from the land whatever he needs. The earth is not his brother, but his enemy, and when he has conquered it, he moves on.

    One thing we know, which the White Man may one day discover -our God is the same God. You may think now that you own Him as you wish to own your land; but you cannot. He is the God of humanity, and his compassion is equal for the red man and the white. The earth is precious to him, and to harm the earth is to heap contempt on its Creator … Even the white man cannot be exempt from the common destiny. We may be brothers after all. We shall see.

Chief Seattle died on June 7, 1866, on the Port Madison Reservation near the city which today bears his name.

thank you seattle ! thank you robert, robert, helen, and more
after all that, sure gotta find more . . .

here, have a look at danish manisha’s own beautiful, first music video of the same story

all began with rachel

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

silent spring here in warm winter
last night, saw it all from beginning
so much more than i ever thought

if about time, sure is here & now
( try it – if not there at her pix, try a click here – )
2-HR PBS AMERICAN EXPERIENCE SILENT SPRING

thanks again rachel

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

let’s help

tough for us ?

haitians hardest getting past matthew’s horror
haitian death toll now reported over 1,000

pax christi florida is helping
so can we all

haiti-matthew-pcf5w300f

haiti-matthew-cnn1-5w300f

haiti-matthew-cnn2-5w300f

5525c7a7-c3c4-44fd-b459-760f73ff9f67

Pax Christi Florida donated to the Sakala program run by Pax Christi Haiti
for restoration efforts in Cité Soleil, Port-au-Prince

Sakala provides a safe space in the heart of Haiti’s largest underdeveloped area
where youth come together to grow, learn, and play.

You too can donate, CLICK HERE

ec893726-f4cd-4c0f-b1de-6098ae92c966

Recommended by Pax Christi FL member, Mary Ann Holtz

Dear friends,

Please join me in dipping into our emergency funds and/or foregoing eating out/special treats in order to share our excess with the most vulnerable in Haiti.

I spoke with my friend, David Diggs at Beyond Borders, this morning and they are already planning with their other partner organizations to respond as soon as the storm passes Haiti and staff is able to get out to assess needs.

As you may remember from prior emails from me, I have been partnering with Beyond Borders for years.  It is likely that the community I have been partnering with on LaGonav has lost its school building.  Our hope is to help get the kids back in school ASAP since this helps them recover from this trauma.

To donate in a way that ensures your sharing is used wisely and well: 
BEYOND BORDERS

As we begin to read about and see the images of the devastation, let’s allow the grief to flow through us into prayer and action.

Mary Ann

1e4a770c-88d3-46b4-946b-ca6623ad85ee

The Quixote Center is a multi-issue grassroots organization pursuing social justice and equality. We strive to make our world, our nation, and our church more just, peaceful, and equitable in policy and practice.

Hurricane Matthew has ravaged southern Haiti, a region already fighting for survival. The storm collapsed the principal bridge connecting the region to the rest of the country, making aid and relief efforts especially challenging. Communications are largely out, and until they are restored it is impossible to know th e full extent of the damage. We are waiting to hear from two colleagues in the region. Major damages from Hurricane Matthew will be seen in lack of clean water, the destruction of homes, and the drastic depletion of livestock.

High winds and heavy rainfall have damaged homes and caused flooding of low-lying areas of Gros-Morne, but our partners report that the effects were less severe in this area than predicted. I believe that this is due in part to the massive reforestation effort that the Quixote Center network has supported in the region for more than twenty years.

I am writing to ask you to reach deep in your pocket and donate to the relief effort in the south. We will direct these funds to organizations rebuilding in Les Cayes and Jeremie. Please make a donation today to kick off the relief and rebuilding effort. A gift today will help to sustain these struggling communities in the wake of this historic storm.

From all of us at the Quixote Center and from our friends in Haiti: THANK YOU!

With Hope,

Andrew Hocchalter
To donate, CLICK HERE

Pax Christi Florida
Mercy-on-the-Manatee
505 Palm Avenue
Ellenton, FL 34222

Nancy O’Byrne
Pax Christi Florida’s Coordinator
obyrnen@bellsouth.net

matthew coming – anyone else ?

hurricanematthewvps8w120f

matthew’s coming
as many before, nobody’s connecting

like 2012 debates once more
& over again – no one’s talking

deny the thing
not til knocking down own front door

everybody from everywhere wants up
nobody from anywhere sees whats up

coasting up, ma telling it loud & clear
esp tomorrow here in central florida

last night not a soul mentions her
not mike, not tim, not moderator-self

nowhere even on google this morn
. . . what-the-hell?

~ jim

well, one observer did once ask it too . . .


grist2w72

Climate change got 82 seconds in the presidential debate

By Emma Foehringer Merchant on Sep 27, 2016

One minute and 22 seconds were spent on climate change and other environmental issues in Monday’s presidential debate — and that was pretty much all Hillary Clinton talking. (Surprise, surprise.) How does that compare to debates in past years? We ran the numbers on the past five election cycles to find out.

The high point for attention to green issues came in 2000, when Al Gore and George W. Bush spent just over 14 minutes talking about the environment over the course of three debates. The low point came in 2012, when climate change and other environmental issues got no time at all during the presidential debates. Some years, climate change came up during the vice presidential debates as well.

2016 so far: 1 minute, 22 seconds in one presidential debate. A split-second in the vice presidential debate.

2012: 0 minutes.

2008: 5 minutes, 18 seconds in two presidential debates. An additional 5 minutes, 48 seconds in a vice presidential debate.

2004: 5 minutes, 14 seconds in a single presidential debate.

2000: 14 minutes, 3 seconds in three presidential debates. 5 minutes, 21 seconds in a vice presidential debate. ( Al Gore – GW Bush )

In total, over the five election seasons we looked at, climate change and the environment got 37 minutes and 6 seconds on the prime-time stage during the presidential and vice presidential debates. That’s out of more than 1,500 minutes of debate. Not an impressive showing.