seed: the untold story

. . . about time to hear it & tell it, this money life of ours attempting to take it all

what a story !
do get the chance to see it in full, as we just did

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hanging on more & more to what was

scientists take us back before it’s all gone

Arks of the Apocalypse

HAVE A LOOK – FINE NYT MAGAZINE ARTICLE W/ PIX

have a look at your cousins

. . . 10,000 years later, can we get along ?
ok, we do all know, probably not so

going deeper, what was it really like living that life of theirs ?
what a movie – takes us there – times & places all their own

very little explained, so huge getting in
one pure meditation of our fellows, their families, world all around

beautifully, amazingly filmed over space & time
thank you, thank you once more, jacques & jacques !!

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

let’s help

tough for us ?

haitians hardest getting past matthew’s horror
haitian death toll now reported over 1,000

pax christi florida is helping
so can we all

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Pax Christi Florida donated to the Sakala program run by Pax Christi Haiti
for restoration efforts in Cité Soleil, Port-au-Prince

Sakala provides a safe space in the heart of Haiti’s largest underdeveloped area
where youth come together to grow, learn, and play.

You too can donate, CLICK HERE

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Recommended by Pax Christi FL member, Mary Ann Holtz

Dear friends,

Please join me in dipping into our emergency funds and/or foregoing eating out/special treats in order to share our excess with the most vulnerable in Haiti.

I spoke with my friend, David Diggs at Beyond Borders, this morning and they are already planning with their other partner organizations to respond as soon as the storm passes Haiti and staff is able to get out to assess needs.

As you may remember from prior emails from me, I have been partnering with Beyond Borders for years.  It is likely that the community I have been partnering with on LaGonav has lost its school building.  Our hope is to help get the kids back in school ASAP since this helps them recover from this trauma.

To donate in a way that ensures your sharing is used wisely and well: 
BEYOND BORDERS

As we begin to read about and see the images of the devastation, let’s allow the grief to flow through us into prayer and action.

Mary Ann

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The Quixote Center is a multi-issue grassroots organization pursuing social justice and equality. We strive to make our world, our nation, and our church more just, peaceful, and equitable in policy and practice.

Hurricane Matthew has ravaged southern Haiti, a region already fighting for survival. The storm collapsed the principal bridge connecting the region to the rest of the country, making aid and relief efforts especially challenging. Communications are largely out, and until they are restored it is impossible to know th e full extent of the damage. We are waiting to hear from two colleagues in the region. Major damages from Hurricane Matthew will be seen in lack of clean water, the destruction of homes, and the drastic depletion of livestock.

High winds and heavy rainfall have damaged homes and caused flooding of low-lying areas of Gros-Morne, but our partners report that the effects were less severe in this area than predicted. I believe that this is due in part to the massive reforestation effort that the Quixote Center network has supported in the region for more than twenty years.

I am writing to ask you to reach deep in your pocket and donate to the relief effort in the south. We will direct these funds to organizations rebuilding in Les Cayes and Jeremie. Please make a donation today to kick off the relief and rebuilding effort. A gift today will help to sustain these struggling communities in the wake of this historic storm.

From all of us at the Quixote Center and from our friends in Haiti: THANK YOU!

With Hope,

Andrew Hocchalter
To donate, CLICK HERE

Pax Christi Florida
Mercy-on-the-Manatee
505 Palm Avenue
Ellenton, FL 34222

Nancy O’Byrne
Pax Christi Florida’s Coordinator
obyrnen@bellsouth.net

panama’s indigenous using drones to save their rainforest

. . . and for these ma-pix always we’ve been needing
( from me too  . . . soon )

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation by david iaconangelo, staff christian science monitor, 6/11/16

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation
by david iaconangelo, staff
christian science monitor, 6/11/16

 

In Panama, indigenous tribes are turning to a modern tool to help protect their homes: drones.

Vast rainforests, which once covered more than half of Panama’s land surface, are shrinking – eaten away by development, both official and unofficial. Forest land is becoming mines, hydroelectric projects, farmland, cattle habitat, and the site of illegal logging.

In response, seven indigenous tribes, whose members live in autonomous zones known as comarcas, have begun sending up drones to keep an eye on their forests.

Three members from each tribe received a month of training on how to use the drones, REUTERS REPORTS. That included FLIGHT PLAN DESIGN, ASSEMBLY, MANEUVERING, and image processing, reports the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Indigenous groups are running the program in conjunction with the Panamanian environmental authority, the Rainforest Foundation, and the FAO, a UN anti-deforestation program.

The FAO believes the program will help tribes monitor watersheds, crop harvests, and forest fires by taking high-resolution images, among other data, that identify deforestation and other negative changes to forest cover.

“These tools enable us to better know the forests’ characteristics and resources we have in our territories,” said Eliseo Quintero, a representative of the Ngäbe-Buglé tribe, in a statement to Reuters.

The Ngöbe-Buglé comarca, located in the western part of Panama, is both the country’s largest comarca and one of the two most affected by deforestation, along with Darien province along the border with Colombia.

The drones have proven especially helpful in monitoring areas where manpower is limited and the rainforest is vast. Last May, NPR reported that a Peruvian conservation group was using drones TO SURVEY AND TAKE PICTURES OF A 145,000-MILE SWATH of the Amazon that had come under pressure from illegal loggers and miners.

Drones have fought deforestation another way, too: planting trees.

The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR’S KEVIN TRUONG reported in September that the group BioCarbon Engineering, led by a NASA engineer, was using drones “in the entire three-step planting method. First, using mapping software to create accurate imaging of the prospective planting area. Second, actually planting the trees. And third, going back to monitor the progress and growth of their technological handiwork.”

And it’s not a minute too soon. Panama LOSES ABOUT 50,000 ACRES (50,000 hectares) of rainforest annually, estimates ANCON, a Panamanian conservation association, while some 2 million hectares of land and water resources – an area the size of New Jersey – is degraded each year. Reforestation efforts have yielded about 75,000 hectares of secondary growth.

Deforestation hurts the economy, too. In a 2014 study, THE UN ESTIMATED that the damage to rainforest from 1999-2012 cost Panama about $3.7 million, adding that better stewardship could create jobs while producing more food and preserving watersheds and other natural resources.

Rosilena Lindo, head of the Climate Change Unit of the Ministry of Environment of Panama, called the drone monitoring system “part of our country’s commitment to address the adverse effects of climate change.”

She said the country hopes to increase the carbon absorption capacity of its forests by at least 10 percent, or more with international financial support.

together with earth

coming back after losing touch

YES issue 73, Spring 2015 Together With Earath

YES issue 73, Spring 2015
Together With Earth

fine subscription always pointing to the do-able & positive -even here
this issue devoted to essays making it happen on our beloved planet
pages well worth living with

So-called modern progress has depended on exploiting the Earth’s resources as if they had no end. We’ve lost touch with the ancient wisdom that we are partners with Earth and all life on it. But we’re approaching a moment when enough of us reclaim our sacred connection with Earth to give us a chance to save a dying planet.

Bigger than Science and Religion – by Richard Schiffman
about genesis farm of dominican sisters of caldwell, n.j. inspired by poet thomas berry’s life vision

Undo! Seven Ways We’re Fixing the Damage – by Diane Brooks
– releasing the rivers
– botanical remedies
– citizen turtle guardians
– swimming pool becomes backyard farm
– making room for carnivores
– asphalt be gone
– rebuild smarter

Wisdom-keepers, United – by Jennifer Browdy, photos by Jane Feldman
when the grandmothers awoke

Fight For Life – by David Goodman
deep in the amazon, a tiny tribe is beating big oil

Alternative Grammar: A New Language of Kinship – by Robin Kimmerer
a new word for “it” to heal our relationship with mother earth

Bioregionalism: Organic borders stronger than political ones by Rachael Stoeve
managing whole rivers in new zealand, mexico, united states

Living Earth Economics – author David Korten interviewed by Editor Dean Paton
YES founder’s new story replacing the gospel of money,
succeeding his When Corporations Rule The World (1995).

Swallowed By Whales – by Kiliii Fish
photographer’s spiritual encounter at sea

Revolution Starts Small and Close To Home – by Wendell Berry
reprinted from Our Only World by kentucky poet-farmer