Our Planet – yes, it’s beautiful !!

thank you david attenborough !  ( your latest from our previous blog )

we’ve finally finished all-6 on netflix here at home. PLEASE DO TOO !
sure tells us who we are. sure suggests what to do. DO WE GOTTA !

meantime, like our planet itself – IT IS BEAUTIFUL !

prince puts it beautifully

thanks to this, ma’s tears have a chance


 

in a word: WOW!

HOME: has to be the definitive statement on global warming. thank you YANN ARTHUS-BERTRAND & team. and thanks julia mader of RASAYANA COVE our unique healing ashram here in florida who finally just brought the placid-shattering documentary to my attention during a recent retreat.

after watching this preview click HERE to to take in the full 1.5-hour extravaganza. if you’re like me, it’ll take you more than a single sitting to take it all in. i advise you give it all the time it’s asking. and need i add, it’s best @ full-resolution, full-screen, and turn up those ancillary speakers!

going on 3 yrs now since its release; where’ve i been??

devastating, of course, but doesn’t just leave you there; simply too late to be a pessimist! as they put it. music – aerials – narration – silences all of highest caliber and orchestration together, nothing less than what our miraculous, embattled mother planet deserves. ties in everything you’ve already heard about our number one global crisis- and then some! talk about moved by mother!

the film appeared on june 5, 2009, world environment day, the first film ever to be released simultaneously in theaters – on tv – dvd – internet, free in 5 continents and 14 languages, the director giving up all copyright rights. YOU’LL WANT TO READ THE FILM’S WIKIPEDIA ENTRY

ex-UN climate chief: talks are rudderless

Not alone in investing little hope in durban’s outcome
( save for the blessed, ubiquitous 99 ) . . .

environmental activists confront police as they attempt to gain access to the UN Climate Change Conference (COP17) during a demonstration in durban on dec 2, 2011

DURBAN, South Africa (AP) — Yvo de Boer said he left his job as the U.N.’s top climate official in frustration 18 months ago, believing the process of negotiating a meaningful climate agreement was failing. His opinion hasn’t changed.

“I still have the same view of the process that led me to leave the process,” he told The Associated Press Sunday. “I’m still deeply concerned about where it’s going, or rather where it’s not going, about the lack of progress.”

For three years until 2010, the Dutch civil servant was the leading voice on global warming on the world stage. He appeared constantly in public to advocate green policies, traveled endlessly for private meetings with top leaders and labored with negotiators seeking ways to finesse snags in drafting agreements.

In the end he felt he “wasn’t really able to contribute as I should be to the process,” he said.

Today he can take a long view on his years as a Dutch negotiator in the 1990s and later as a senior U.N. official with access to the highest levels of government, business and civil society. He is able to voice criticisms he was reluctant to air when he was actively shepherding climate diplomacy.

Negotiators live “in a separate universe,” and the ongoing talks are “like a log that’s drifted away,” he said. Then, drawing another metaphor from his rich reservoir, he called the annual 194-nation conferences “a bit of a mouse wheel.”

De Boer spoke to the AP on the sidelines of the latest round of talks in this South African port city, which he is attending as a consultant for the international accounting firm KPMG.

Elsewhere in Durban Sunday, the South African host of the talks called for divine help at a climate change church service organized by the South African Council of Churches.

“We needed to pray for (an) acceptable, balanced outcome, that has a sense of urgency,” said Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, who as South Africa’s foreign minister is president of the Durban round of negotiations. Priests laid their hands on her head in blessing during the service.

De Boer said world leaders have failed to become deeply engaged in efforts to reach an international accord to control greenhouse gas emissions causing global warming. In recent years, their inattention has been compounded by their preoccupation with the economic and Eurozone crises.

Negotiators have been at the job so long — since the 1992 climate convention — that they have lost touch with the real world, he said. But it wasn’t their fault.

“I completely understand that it is very difficult for a negotiator to move if you haven’t been given a political sense of direction and the political space to move,” he said, chatting on a hilltop terrace overlooking the Indian Ocean.

Rather than act in their own national interests, many leaders look to see what others are willing — or unwilling — to concede.

“You’ve got a bunch of international leaders sitting 85 stories up on the edge of a building saying to each other, you jump first and I’ll follow. And there is understandably a reluctance to be the first one to jump,” he said.

The 2009 Copenhagen summit was a breaking point. Expectations soared that the conference would produce an accord setting firm rules for bringing down global carbon emissions. When delegates fell short, hopes remained high that President Barack Obama, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao, most of Europe’s heads of government and more than 100 other top leaders would save the day at the last minute.

De Boer said he spent the last 24 hours of the summit in “a very small and very smelly room” with about 20 prime ministers and presidents, but the time was not ripe for the hoped-for international treaty.

Obama still hoped to push domestic legislation through the Senate, and any prior commitment to a U.N. treaty would have killed his chances. The bill died anyway. China and India, too, were not ready in Copenhagen to accept internationally binding limits on their emissions.

Many Americans, he said, have still not bought into the “green story,” he said. In the meantime, the U.S. is losing a competitive edge against China, which is investing heavily to shift the course of its economy — from which it will benefit regardless of the global warming issue, he said.

Despite their failures, De Boer said he thought most leaders sincerely want a deal on climate change.

“I do not see the negotiating process being able to rise to that challenge, being capable of delivering on that,” he said. “I believe the sincerity on the part of world leaders is there, but it’s almost as though they do not have control of the process that’s suppose to take them there.”

we’ll get thru this too

Some good news about what’s ahead
in the very long run! . . .

crossing the bering strait

by Daily Mail Reporter, 11/20/11

Climate change over the past two million years has boosted human evolution by forcing us to adapt to changing conditions and allowing us to migrate to new areas. Researchers found that far from hindering our development, periods when the earth is either cooling or warming up have actually been highly beneficial. As well as prompting us to migrate, changes in climate have also forced humans to evolve culturally by encouraging us to learn to work together.

Far from hindering human development scientists now believe periods of climate change helped us evolve. Experts from the National History Museum and Cambridge University have identified five key time periods when shifts in global climate have resulted in accelerated social and genetic evolution.

The first began around two million years ago when a prolonged dry period caused forests to disappear leading to the emergence of Homo erectus – an early human adapted to running and hunting on the grassy plains.

The next major development came during the ice age which began 450,000 years ago during which scientists believe human beings were split into three separate groups. European humans evolved into Neanderthals while Asian humans evolved into Denisovans.

Those remaining on the African subcontinent evolved into modern human beings but this group had to wait until around 60,000 years ago when a prolonged warm spell allowed them to spread north. Then a sustained cold period between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago caused further changes as the freezing temperatures caused a 330ft drop in sea levels allowing humans to cross the Bering land bridge into North America.

Wild fluctuations in climate between 14,000 and 10,000 years ago prompted another period of change by forcing humans to develop agricultural techniques which enabled them to stabilise food supplies.

Chris Stringer of London’s Natural History Museum and author of The Origin of Our Species told the Sunday Times: ‘Climate change has been a major player in our evolution.’ The Royal Society is holding a conference this week where details of recent research will be released. The scientists are keen to point out they are not suggesting that modern global warming is beneficial. Rhiannon Stevens of Cambridge University who is co-organising the conference told the newspaper: ‘What intrigues them is the growing evidence that human evolution and climate change have been inextricably linked for hundreds of thousands of years.’

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