panama’s indigenous using drones to save their rainforest

. . . and for these ma-pix always we’ve been needing
( from me too  . . . soon )

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation by david iaconangelo, staff christian science monitor, 6/11/16

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation
by david iaconangelo, staff
christian science monitor, 6/11/16

 

In Panama, indigenous tribes are turning to a modern tool to help protect their homes: drones.

Vast rainforests, which once covered more than half of Panama’s land surface, are shrinking – eaten away by development, both official and unofficial. Forest land is becoming mines, hydroelectric projects, farmland, cattle habitat, and the site of illegal logging.

In response, seven indigenous tribes, whose members live in autonomous zones known as comarcas, have begun sending up drones to keep an eye on their forests.

Three members from each tribe received a month of training on how to use the drones, REUTERS REPORTS. That included FLIGHT PLAN DESIGN, ASSEMBLY, MANEUVERING, and image processing, reports the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Indigenous groups are running the program in conjunction with the Panamanian environmental authority, the Rainforest Foundation, and the FAO, a UN anti-deforestation program.

The FAO believes the program will help tribes monitor watersheds, crop harvests, and forest fires by taking high-resolution images, among other data, that identify deforestation and other negative changes to forest cover.

“These tools enable us to better know the forests’ characteristics and resources we have in our territories,” said Eliseo Quintero, a representative of the Ngäbe-Buglé tribe, in a statement to Reuters.

The Ngöbe-Buglé comarca, located in the western part of Panama, is both the country’s largest comarca and one of the two most affected by deforestation, along with Darien province along the border with Colombia.

The drones have proven especially helpful in monitoring areas where manpower is limited and the rainforest is vast. Last May, NPR reported that a Peruvian conservation group was using drones TO SURVEY AND TAKE PICTURES OF A 145,000-MILE SWATH of the Amazon that had come under pressure from illegal loggers and miners.

Drones have fought deforestation another way, too: planting trees.

The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR’S KEVIN TRUONG reported in September that the group BioCarbon Engineering, led by a NASA engineer, was using drones “in the entire three-step planting method. First, using mapping software to create accurate imaging of the prospective planting area. Second, actually planting the trees. And third, going back to monitor the progress and growth of their technological handiwork.”

And it’s not a minute too soon. Panama LOSES ABOUT 50,000 ACRES (50,000 hectares) of rainforest annually, estimates ANCON, a Panamanian conservation association, while some 2 million hectares of land and water resources – an area the size of New Jersey – is degraded each year. Reforestation efforts have yielded about 75,000 hectares of secondary growth.

Deforestation hurts the economy, too. In a 2014 study, THE UN ESTIMATED that the damage to rainforest from 1999-2012 cost Panama about $3.7 million, adding that better stewardship could create jobs while producing more food and preserving watersheds and other natural resources.

Rosilena Lindo, head of the Climate Change Unit of the Ministry of Environment of Panama, called the drone monitoring system “part of our country’s commitment to address the adverse effects of climate change.”

She said the country hopes to increase the carbon absorption capacity of its forests by at least 10 percent, or more with international financial support.

choose your pedal – bikes vs cars

beautifully done in jammed up cities like sao paolo, los angeles, toronto
and some like amsterdam and copenhagen where bikes have their way

what’s left of us who worry most, act less

. . . A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that even members of the public who are “alarmed” about a warming planet show relatively low levels of public-sphere action, such as volunteering or protesting. The paper then sought to get to the bottom of why that is, investigating “what drives public actions of the certain segment of the population that’s already really concerned about climate change,” said Kathryn Doherty, a research associate at the Social and Environmental Research Institute in Massachusetts and lead author of the paper.

Why even the people who worry the most about climate change often take little action, Chelsea Harvey, May 16, 2016, The Washington Post, Energy and Environment

*   *   *

( my return note yesterday . . . )

thanks seri & wash post – that’s where i am too

nearby activist friend john of clearly charged living
must also be asking that of me

ok, these goings on of my own don’t take me there
yet some do keep me chasing what to do for our ma

this retirement age – these final days
free at last, oh so happy keeping it so simple

plugged into earth’s sensitivity
what can be this beautiful, so very natural !

then too, what to do if wife & me really could ?
yes, live so in public – join an ecovillage

meantime every roadtime’s loaded with bumps
” why am i pumping so much carbon too ? ”

that’s when a cool intellect starts its message
” simply member of a culture; not your fault ”

get them to do it first, as naomi’s been showing
tax those fossil fuels for all the mess they’re giving us

meantime am doing what i can to spread the word
. . . compost too

that’s about it
not that much here either, wash post

tho at least this, an old familiar thing –
admitting as much of ME before saying so of OTHERS

~ jim rucquoi
shemovesme.com

bernieporch3-10H72FS

fossil fuels – keep ’em down

. . . more 350.org happenings around the world

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full of action happenings – stories – photos
CHECK THEM OUT – JOIN THEM WHERE YOU CAN

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as florida goes under

. . . time to remind us who we are – from the top
do add your name too

was happy to respond this morning
you too a drowning floridian ?
DO ADD YOUR NAME AS WELL

beauty & disobedience

. . . much less than one month apart
for sure – ma does need us bigtime

one of the best action movies of our time
do take a look

ma’s day – my day

. . . coming together again for 2016

at last bertrand piccard takes off too on april 21st
from hawaii headed for california back to first round-the-world solar flight

way to go bertie
long one of my own dreams
RIGHT HERE AT THE MAC

same days, once again tadpole fundles ma’s green & blue posh
this time south on florida’s wondrous
WITHLACOOCHEE BIKE TRAIL

( sorry – my video’s a bit off this time )

top poet friend, our own bernie, he’s along too this time
with this in hand – always whatalaugh !

RucquoiJim - HE TRAVELS FOR HER GLORY II 2.pages

ma’s all-earth guardian editor, following those strong dec paris days
brings us up to date once again at UN’s signup

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Hello,

Yesterday was EARTH DAY. Fittingly, more than 170 countries went to New York to SIGN THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT, a record-breaking number of first-day signatures for an international treaty. ( In case you wondered, the Convention on the Law of the Sea was the previous record holder, with 119 countries in 1982 ).

But Ban Ki-Moon, who hosted the ceremony along with heads of state and climate champions including Al Gore and Leonardo DiCaprio, pointed out that other climate record are being broken right now. RECORD TEMPERATURES GLOBALLY, NEW LOWS FOR SEA ICE, MASS BLEACHING OF CORAL REEFS and UNHEARD-OF LEAPS IN CO2 LEVELS IN OUR ATMOSPHERE.

Against that alarming backdrop, the pressure is on countries to do more and do it faster. Our correspondent Suzanne Goldenberg as been talking to experts including Jeffrey Sachs on what happens next, and HOW GOVERNMENTS ARE STILL FAILING TO GRASP THE URGENCY OF DEEPLY CUTTING EMISSIONS.

Webby Awards

I’m also writing to thank those of you who generously took minutes out of your day to VOTE FOR US IN THE WEBBYS FOR OUR COVERAGE OF THE MEKONG. It now looks likely our coverage of the river and its people’s fate will win an award, and the issue will get a much needed spotlight.

Adam Vaughan
Editor, THE GUARDIAN.COM/ENVIRONMENT

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finally friends, speaking of earth day, lets have a look at this
what all-year bunch tells us about rising positive happenings around our globe

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