enough, enough !

time to go right to the top – for ma herself
if not recognizing what happened right here, this weekend

full ICN quote below
what only make’s sense this morning
after yet more trump-awful from last night

meantime, thanks pres obama for all you’re doing
along with everyone pulling the paris agreement into action

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Published on INSIDE CLIMATE NEWS

CLIMATE CHANGE TREATED AS AFTERTHOUGHT
IN SECOND PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE

Following the devastation from Hurricane Matthew
and a campaign urging moderators to ask a climate question,
the issue was again ignored.

By Marianne Lavelle, InsideClimate News

Oct 10, 2016

Hillary Clinton affirmed her commitment to fighting climate change, while Donald Trump pledged to take advantage of what he called “clean coal” stores that will last a thousand years, in response to a question on energy policy in Sunday night’s presidential debate.

Climate change was treated as an afterthought, despite a campaign by environmental activists urging moderators to press the candidates on the issue—especially on a weekend that saw the southeast U.S. coast battered, and Haiti devastated, by the extreme weather conditions from Hurricane Matthew.

The debate focused on topics that drove much of the presidential campaign coverage over the weekend, in particular the revelation of a video in which Trump made lewd and aggressive comments about women.

The query on energy came near the end of the contentious evening, designed in a town-hall style with undecided voters reading many of the questions. The energy question didn’t mention climate change but was focused on the nation’s production of energy. “What steps will your energy policy take to meet our energy needs,” a member of the audience asked, “while at the same time remaining environmentally friendly, and minimizing job loss for fossil power plant workers?”

Republican Trump, answering first, launched into an attack on environmental regulators. “Energy is under siege by the Obama administration, under absolute siege,” he said. “The Environmental Protection Agency is killing these energy companies.

“Now, I’m all for alternative forms of energy, including wind, including solar, but we need much more than wind and solar,” he said.

“Hillary Clinton wants to put all the miners out of business,” Trump claimed. “There is a thing called clean coal. Coal will last for 1,000 years in this country.”

He also spoke of the fracking boom and pledged to continue to encourage it: “Now we have natural gas and so many other things because of technology. Over the last seven years, we have found tremendous wealth right under our feet. I will bring our energy companies back. They’ll be able to compete, they’ll make money, they’ll pay off our national debt,” Trump said.

In sum, it was a repetition of Trump’s all-of-the-above, drill-baby-drill “America first” energy policy. And it continued his denunciation of the “war on coal” that he and his running mate have articulated as they dismiss the climate crisis as a meaningful issue.

Democrat Clinton, as she did often during the evening, walked close to the questioner to answer and said to him that it sounds as though he works in the energy industry. She said it was good that the U.S. was energy independent “for the first time ever,” but said the Middle East still controls the price of oil.

Clinton then turned to alternatives, beginning with natural gas, a sign that she, too, favors the all-of-the-above approach to fossil fuels.

“We are…producing a lot of natural gas, which serves as a bridge to more renewable fuels, and I think that is an important transition,” Clinton said. “We have got to remain energy independent. That gives us a lot more freedom and power than to worry about what goes on in the Middle East.”

“I have a comprehensive energy policy,” Clinton told the questioner, “but it really does include fighting climate change, because I think that is a serious problem. And I support moving to more clean, renewable energy because I believe we can be the 21st century clean energy superpower.”

Clinton said that her policy included a plan to revitalize coal communities along the way: “I want to make sure we don’t leave people behind.”

Some climate activists put out statements immediately after the debate expressing disappointment that the global crisis had been given short shrift. “We finally got a question about energy policy in the 89th minute of the debate, although it left out any mention of climate change,” said 350 Action Executive Director May Boeve. Nevertheless, Boeve said the answers revealed the “fault lines” in the election. “Trump doubled down on fossil fuels, while Hillary talked about a clean energy future that doesn’t leave anyone behind.”

Boeve did take issue with Clinton’s reference to natural gas as a bridge fuel: “It’s just a fast lane to more climate destruction,” she said. But she added that the group would work for her election: “350 Action will do everything we can to defeat Trump and then get to work pushing Hillary Clinton to move our country off all fossil fuels, including natural gas.”

Greenpeace USA Executive Director Annie Leonard likewise lamented the debate’s handling of the subject. “The candidates spent very little time talking about climate change during tonight’s debate but it is on the minds of so many Americans, especially as Hurricane Matthew continues to take a heavy toll here and in Haiti,” she said in a statement. “Climate change demands the attention of both candidates and their parties, and it is shameful that it was given so little.”

Environmental and social activist groups, led by the League of Conservation Voters and Media Matters for America, a media watchdog grop, organized a social media drive that gathered 150,000 signatures urging moderators to bring up the topic.

“This summer, the climate crisis has fallen right into America’s front yards—from devastating floods in Louisiana to damaging droughts and sweltering heat, we are feeling the impacts of climate change every day,” said the environmentalists’ petition. “Yet according to a recent Media Matters study, ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox collectively spent five percent less time covering climate change in 2015 despite landmark actions to address global warming.”

Four questions on climate and energy were voted into the top 30 questions in the online poll organized by the Open Debate Coalition [1]. The organization, started in 2008 by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs and progressive and conservative groups, has pushed for a debate format that allows for crowdsourced questions. The moderators of Sunday’s debate had agreed to “consider” the 30 most upvoted questions on the site. More than 3.8 million votes were recorded for some 15,900 questions.

“What are the steps you will take to address climate change? [2]” was the fourth most popular question on the site. It received 46,470 up votes, coming behind two queries on guns and one on Social Security.

The moderators asked one question from the online forum, about new Clinton emails posted on Wikileaks.

The high priority that poll participants gave to climate change contrasts with the topic’s near invisibility during the campaign. Trump’s only public statements on climate change were regarding a tweet he sent in 2012 claiming global warming was a hoax invented by the Chinese.

During the candidates’ first debate on Sept. 26, Clinton brought up Trump’s hoax statement as an example of the contrast between the two candidates. After Trump responded bluntly that it wasn’t true, his 2012 post became the most retweeted tweet during the debate.

CNN columnist John Sutter has called climate change “the most important issue [4] almost no one is talking about this campaign season.” And New York Times columnist Paul Krugman wrote on Friday that it would be “almost criminally irresponsible [5]” for the debate moderators to ignore it. “There is, quite simply, no other issue this important,” he wrote.

After last week’s vice presidential debate ended with only a brief mention of climate change, Heather Hargreaves, vice president of NextGen Climate, a political group run by Clinton supporter Tom Steyer, said in a statement: “Voters rely on debate moderators and the media to hold the candidates accountable for their views—a clear debate on the differences between the candidates’ climate policies is vital in helping inform citizens who will be making critical choices for their futures on November 8th.”

Although President Obama and his Republican opponent John McCain were asked about climate change [6] by an audience member in their 2008 town hall debate, global warming did not come up in the 2012 presidential debates. Clinton and her primary opponent Bernie Sanders faced off extensively [7] on climate and energy in an April debate. But Media Matters [8] noted that Trump did not have to field a single climate change question through 11 GOP primary debates. He has not had to address his climate denial in media interviews.

TV news coverage leading up to the debate focused on the revelations of recordings of Trump, which touched off a crisis in the Republican party. Some prominent Republicans withdrew their endorsements of him and the GOP suspended its Trump campaign activities.

Environmental scientist Peter Gleick, who has been calling for more attention to climate change in the campaign, tweeted before the debate that a climate question might come as a welcome relief for Trump.

Here are the other three climate and energy questions that made it into the top 30 on the Open Debate Coalition’s website:

Ranked 10th most upvoted: What is your plan to combat climate change & build a green economy? [11]

Ranked 14th: What will you do to protect the rights of Native Americans and their land? [12] ( related to the fight over the Dakota Access oil pipeline)

Ranked 29th: Is Climate Change a national security issue? Why or why not? [13]

Published Under:
Politics [14]
Election 2016 [15]
© InsideClimate Newsn

in the sky, around the world,

w/o a drop of fuel !

taking off 3/9/15, solar impulse 2 returns to abu dhabi 7/26/16, sun-powered the whole way

taking off 3/9/15, solar impulse 2 returns to abu dhabi 7/26/16, sun-powered the whole way

high thanks, swiss bertrand piccard & andré borschberg
http://www.solarimpulse.com

what’s left of us who worry most, act less

. . . A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that even members of the public who are “alarmed” about a warming planet show relatively low levels of public-sphere action, such as volunteering or protesting. The paper then sought to get to the bottom of why that is, investigating “what drives public actions of the certain segment of the population that’s already really concerned about climate change,” said Kathryn Doherty, a research associate at the Social and Environmental Research Institute in Massachusetts and lead author of the paper.

Why even the people who worry the most about climate change often take little action, Chelsea Harvey, May 16, 2016, The Washington Post, Energy and Environment

*   *   *

( my return note yesterday . . . )

thanks seri & wash post – that’s where i am too

nearby activist friend john of clearly charged living
must also be asking that of me

ok, these goings on of my own don’t take me there
yet some do keep me chasing what to do for our ma

this retirement age – these final days
free at last, oh so happy keeping it so simple

plugged into earth’s sensitivity
what can be this beautiful, so very natural !

then too, what to do if wife & me really could ?
yes, live so in public – join an ecovillage

meantime every roadtime’s loaded with bumps
” why am i pumping so much carbon too ? ”

that’s when a cool intellect starts its message
” simply member of a culture; not your fault ”

get them to do it first, as naomi’s been showing
tax those fossil fuels for all the mess they’re giving us

meantime am doing what i can to spread the word
. . . compost too

that’s about it
not that much here either, wash post

tho at least this, an old familiar thing –
admitting as much of ME before saying so of OTHERS

~ jim rucquoi
shemovesme.com

bernieporch3-10H72FS

fossil fuels – keep ’em down

. . . more 350.org happenings around the world

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full of action happenings – stories – photos
CHECK THEM OUT – JOIN THEM WHERE YOU CAN

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ma’s day – my day

. . . coming together again for 2016

at last bertrand piccard takes off too on april 21st
from hawaii headed for california back to first round-the-world solar flight

way to go bertie
long one of my own dreams
RIGHT HERE AT THE MAC

same days, once again tadpole fundles ma’s green & blue posh
this time south on florida’s wondrous
WITHLACOOCHEE BIKE TRAIL

( sorry – my video’s a bit off this time )

top poet friend, our own bernie, he’s along too this time
with this in hand – always whatalaugh !

RucquoiJim - HE TRAVELS FOR HER GLORY II 2.pages

ma’s all-earth guardian editor, following those strong dec paris days
brings us up to date once again at UN’s signup

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Hello,

Yesterday was EARTH DAY. Fittingly, more than 170 countries went to New York to SIGN THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT, a record-breaking number of first-day signatures for an international treaty. ( In case you wondered, the Convention on the Law of the Sea was the previous record holder, with 119 countries in 1982 ).

But Ban Ki-Moon, who hosted the ceremony along with heads of state and climate champions including Al Gore and Leonardo DiCaprio, pointed out that other climate record are being broken right now. RECORD TEMPERATURES GLOBALLY, NEW LOWS FOR SEA ICE, MASS BLEACHING OF CORAL REEFS and UNHEARD-OF LEAPS IN CO2 LEVELS IN OUR ATMOSPHERE.

Against that alarming backdrop, the pressure is on countries to do more and do it faster. Our correspondent Suzanne Goldenberg as been talking to experts including Jeffrey Sachs on what happens next, and HOW GOVERNMENTS ARE STILL FAILING TO GRASP THE URGENCY OF DEEPLY CUTTING EMISSIONS.

Webby Awards

I’m also writing to thank those of you who generously took minutes out of your day to VOTE FOR US IN THE WEBBYS FOR OUR COVERAGE OF THE MEKONG. It now looks likely our coverage of the river and its people’s fate will win an award, and the issue will get a much needed spotlight.

Adam Vaughan
Editor, THE GUARDIAN.COM/ENVIRONMENT

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finally friends, speaking of earth day, lets have a look at this
what all-year bunch tells us about rising positive happenings around our globe

EDN16-1

EDN16-2

mother earth day coming up – look up . . .

. . . nature doesn’t need people
( we really do need you ! )


sagi-haviv-conservation.jpg

CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL

#NatureSpeaking movies
see & hear ma in downright beautiful ways

SKY
MOUNTAIN
HOME
ICE
MOTHER NATURE
THE OCEAN
THE RAINFOREST
THE SOIL
WATER
THE REDWOOD
CORAL REEF
FLOWER

ride for ma

climate ride’s come a long way since my pedals for her
especially if you’ve much more time on this planet than us oldies
travel down her coast with your gang

CRsummer1200

have a look at all 2016’s great moves – CLIMATERIDE.ORG

CR2016events

about time !!

we load the streets of paris for ma

we load the streets of paris for ma

Friends,

Today is a historic day: as tens of thousands of people filled the streets of Paris, politicians finalized a major new global climate agreement.

The deal in Paris includes an agreement to limit global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius, with an aim of 1.5 degrees, and achieve climate ‘neutrality’ that will require phasing out fossil fuels soon after mid-century. That’s not what we hoped for, but it’s still a deal that sends a signal that it’s time to keep fossil fuels in the ground, and for investors to cut their ties with coal, oil and gas by divesting.

This deal represents important progress — but progress alone is not our goal. Our goal is a just and livable planet.

If followed to the letter, the agreement leaves far too many people exposed to the violence of rising seas, stronger storms and deeper drought. It leaves too many loopholes to avoid serious action — despite the heroic efforts from leaders of vulnerable nations and communities who fought for a deal in line with science.

But the coal, oil and gas corporations of the world should take little comfort. That 2 degree pledge would require keeping 80% of the world’s remaining fossil fuels underground, a 1.5 degree target even more — and countries are required to come back to the table every 5 years to increase their ambition in reaching those goals.

Paris isn’t the end of the story, but a conclusion of a particular chapter. Now, it’s up to us to strengthen these promises, make sure they are kept, and then accelerate the transition away from fossil fuels and towards 100% renewable energy.

AS WORLD LEADERS IN PARIS WERE FINALIZING THE TEXT OF THE DEAL, THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE RETURNED TO THE STREETS OF PARIS TO DEMONSTRATE THEIR COMMITMENT TO CONTINUE THE FIGHT:

They were joined by hundreds of solidarity actions around the world, all echoing the same message: it’s up to us to keep fossil fuels in the ground.

Standing together, flowers in hand, we formed red lines in the street — because lines have to be drawn in this fight for justice, and it’s up to all of us to stand on the side of those on the front lines of this crisis.

More lines are being drawn everywhere against the true villain of the last two weeks: the fossil fuel industry, which has done everything possible to weaken even this late, late deal.

Without pressure from ordinary people, world leaders would have gladly ignored this problem entirely. It’s pressure from people that will close the gap between WHAT WAS SIGNED TODAY AND THE ACTION WE NEED.

This begins the next chapter. Please watch this space for the announcement of something big in the coming days!

If you are reading this, you’ve been part of the work that got us all to this point, and for that, we say thank you. 2015 was a historic year for us — because we worked together to build a more powerful and hopeful climate movement.

With gratitude, and as always, hope,

May and the whole 350.org team

paris dispatch 7

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Dear Jim,

The endgame approaches. Negotiators at the UN climate talks in Paris now have just hours left to find a global consensus on a new climate change deal. Despite the REMAINING STICKING POINTS the mood is still upbeat for a deal. The UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon said on Friday that he was “ENCOURAGED” BY PROGRESS.

” I have been attending many difficult multilateral negotiations, but by any standard, this negotiation is most complicated, most difficult, but most important for humanity . . . I am urging and appealing to all the state parties to take the final decision for humanity. ”

Our team of reporters at the summit are feeding into a live blog which will run throughout today. You can READ LIVE UPDATES HERE.

Yours Sincerely,
James Randerson, assistant national news editor

Friday’s reading list:

*__PARIS DEAL IS ‘CLOSE TO THE LINE’ BUT TALKS SET TO OVERRUN

*__NEW DRAFT TEXT OF THE DEAL CUTS THROUGH KEY STICKING POINTS

*__VIDEO: THE AMAZONIAN TRIBESPEOPLE WHO SAILED DOWN THE SEINE

*__PODCAST: CLIMATE TALKS TURN UP THE HEAT ON WORLD LEADERS

 

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paris dispatch 6

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Dear Jim,

It is crunch time in the UN climate talks in Paris. We had the diplomats wrangling last week but now the politicians have taken up the baton and with only the next day and a half to go, countries are going to have to make their mind up what they want and what they are prepared to sacrifice.

On Wednesday afternoon THE FRENCH HOSTS PUBLISHED A DRAFT OF THE FINAL NEGOTIATING TEXT. It’s a bit shorter, there are many fewer brackets ( points of disagreement that are still unresolved ), but all the core sticking points remain unresolved. Last night the countries met in plenary to give their reactions, and today there will have to be movement if there is to be a deal.

The good news, especially for poor countries, is that the new text now includes the figure of 1.5C as one of three options for a target rise in temperatures ( THIS PIECE BY MY COLLEAGUE ADAM VAUGHAN explains what impacts are likely to be associated with each extra degree of rise ). The other options of ” 2C ” and ” under 2C ” are still there but it does suggest that the pressure put on countries by development groups, churches, the media and others to be ambitious has paid off. It’s another matter whether that is the final figure agreed.

Finance to help poorer countries to adapt to climate change will be a major issue and the text recognizes the $100bn figure promised by 2020, but indicates that this is just a starting point. Although no ongoing figure is given.

Equally, the thorny issue of loss and damage ( what some poor countries see as compensation for climate impacts ) is in the text but with no new language around it. That probably means that no-one is prepared to compromise yet.

As I write this around 400 people from environment and development groups are inside the centre demonstrating that they want countries to be ambitious. The cry is ” 1.5 to stay alive “.

The next 24 hours will decide if there is to be a deal. There will have to be compromises made but by lunchtime we should have the bones of a final agreement. Then there will be long plenary sessions, possibly another text, and a deal possibly on Friday night or Saturday morning.

It could all go wrong but the mood here is positive. Whether they can now find a way through the labyrinth of alternatives and brackets is another matter.

Yours Sincerely,
John Vidal, environment editor, The Guardian

Thursday reading list:

*__DELEGATES WARN OF FLAWS IN AMBITIOUS PROPOSALS FOR DEAL

*__ACTIVISTS ARRESTED AT LOUVRE OIL PROTEST

*__SAUDI ARABIA ACCUSED OF TRYING TO WRECK CLIMATE DEAL

*__£352bn INVESTORS’ COALITION LAUNCHED TO PUSH CLEAN ENERGY

*__MARCH TOWARDS A GREEN FUTURE LIKE TERMINATOR, SAYS ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER

 

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