tribute to life

our 200 greenwood farm + nearbys

our first outdoor decade together in central florida

( 20+ mins, 5 sections )

first week of president, so-called

us greeting him round-the-corner in florida, women’s march,
day after he was tabbed

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

matthew coming – anyone else ?

hurricanematthewvps8w120f

matthew’s coming
as many before, nobody’s connecting

like 2012 debates once more
& over again – no one’s talking

deny the thing
not til knocking down own front door

everybody from everywhere wants up
nobody from anywhere sees whats up

coasting up, ma telling it loud & clear
esp tomorrow here in central florida

last night not a soul mentions her
not mike, not tim, not moderator-self

nowhere even on google this morn
. . . what-the-hell?

~ jim

well, one observer did once ask it too . . .


grist2w72

Climate change got 82 seconds in the presidential debate

By Emma Foehringer Merchant on Sep 27, 2016

One minute and 22 seconds were spent on climate change and other environmental issues in Monday’s presidential debate — and that was pretty much all Hillary Clinton talking. (Surprise, surprise.) How does that compare to debates in past years? We ran the numbers on the past five election cycles to find out.

The high point for attention to green issues came in 2000, when Al Gore and George W. Bush spent just over 14 minutes talking about the environment over the course of three debates. The low point came in 2012, when climate change and other environmental issues got no time at all during the presidential debates. Some years, climate change came up during the vice presidential debates as well.

2016 so far: 1 minute, 22 seconds in one presidential debate. A split-second in the vice presidential debate.

2012: 0 minutes.

2008: 5 minutes, 18 seconds in two presidential debates. An additional 5 minutes, 48 seconds in a vice presidential debate.

2004: 5 minutes, 14 seconds in a single presidential debate.

2000: 14 minutes, 3 seconds in three presidential debates. 5 minutes, 21 seconds in a vice presidential debate. ( Al Gore – GW Bush )

In total, over the five election seasons we looked at, climate change and the environment got 37 minutes and 6 seconds on the prime-time stage during the presidential and vice presidential debates. That’s out of more than 1,500 minutes of debate. Not an impressive showing.

what’s left of us who worry most, act less

. . . A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that even members of the public who are “alarmed” about a warming planet show relatively low levels of public-sphere action, such as volunteering or protesting. The paper then sought to get to the bottom of why that is, investigating “what drives public actions of the certain segment of the population that’s already really concerned about climate change,” said Kathryn Doherty, a research associate at the Social and Environmental Research Institute in Massachusetts and lead author of the paper.

Why even the people who worry the most about climate change often take little action, Chelsea Harvey, May 16, 2016, The Washington Post, Energy and Environment

*   *   *

( my return note yesterday . . . )

thanks seri & wash post – that’s where i am too

nearby activist friend john of clearly charged living
must also be asking that of me

ok, these goings on of my own don’t take me there
yet some do keep me chasing what to do for our ma

this retirement age – these final days
free at last, oh so happy keeping it so simple

plugged into earth’s sensitivity
what can be this beautiful, so very natural !

then too, what to do if wife & me really could ?
yes, live so in public – join an ecovillage

meantime every roadtime’s loaded with bumps
” why am i pumping so much carbon too ? ”

that’s when a cool intellect starts its message
” simply member of a culture; not your fault ”

get them to do it first, as naomi’s been showing
tax those fossil fuels for all the mess they’re giving us

meantime am doing what i can to spread the word
. . . compost too

that’s about it
not that much here either, wash post

tho at least this, an old familiar thing –
admitting as much of ME before saying so of OTHERS

~ jim rucquoi
shemovesme.com

bernieporch3-10H72FS

as florida goes under

. . . time to remind us who we are – from the top
do add your name too

was happy to respond this morning
you too a drowning floridian ?
DO ADD YOUR NAME AS WELL

ma’s day – my day

. . . coming together again for 2016

at last bertrand piccard takes off too on april 21st
from hawaii headed for california back to first round-the-world solar flight

way to go bertie
long one of my own dreams
RIGHT HERE AT THE MAC

same days, once again tadpole fundles ma’s green & blue posh
this time south on florida’s wondrous
WITHLACOOCHEE BIKE TRAIL

( sorry – my video’s a bit off this time )

top poet friend, our own bernie, he’s along too this time
with this in hand – always whatalaugh !

RucquoiJim - HE TRAVELS FOR HER GLORY II 2.pages

ma’s all-earth guardian editor, following those strong dec paris days
brings us up to date once again at UN’s signup

kiitg_banner2b

Hello,

Yesterday was EARTH DAY. Fittingly, more than 170 countries went to New York to SIGN THE PARIS CLIMATE AGREEMENT, a record-breaking number of first-day signatures for an international treaty. ( In case you wondered, the Convention on the Law of the Sea was the previous record holder, with 119 countries in 1982 ).

But Ban Ki-Moon, who hosted the ceremony along with heads of state and climate champions including Al Gore and Leonardo DiCaprio, pointed out that other climate record are being broken right now. RECORD TEMPERATURES GLOBALLY, NEW LOWS FOR SEA ICE, MASS BLEACHING OF CORAL REEFS and UNHEARD-OF LEAPS IN CO2 LEVELS IN OUR ATMOSPHERE.

Against that alarming backdrop, the pressure is on countries to do more and do it faster. Our correspondent Suzanne Goldenberg as been talking to experts including Jeffrey Sachs on what happens next, and HOW GOVERNMENTS ARE STILL FAILING TO GRASP THE URGENCY OF DEEPLY CUTTING EMISSIONS.

Webby Awards

I’m also writing to thank those of you who generously took minutes out of your day to VOTE FOR US IN THE WEBBYS FOR OUR COVERAGE OF THE MEKONG. It now looks likely our coverage of the river and its people’s fate will win an award, and the issue will get a much needed spotlight.

Adam Vaughan
Editor, THE GUARDIAN.COM/ENVIRONMENT

theguardian_logo_161214

 

 

finally friends, speaking of earth day, lets have a look at this
what all-year bunch tells us about rising positive happenings around our globe

EDN16-1

EDN16-2