ok, let’s give it another scientific look

. . . more & more, older & older, closer & closer

 ( want these links ? sorry –
now get to GUARDIAN’S OWN COMMERCIAL LOADED SITE  )

all began with rachel

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

silent spring here in warm winter
last night, saw it all from beginning
so much more than i ever thought

if about time, sure is here & now
( try it – if not there at her pix, try a click here – )
2-HR PBS AMERICAN EXPERIENCE SILENT SPRING

thanks again rachel

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

before the flood – more

czech video editor mirek lefou shares this
10 days after i posted dicaprio’s new preview
a much better chance to see his super work

one great movie, even if restricted under nat georgraphic’s new $$ fox-top
keeping it down past leonardo welcoming us all to see his best
so ok, we’ll all take part in sharing our planet first-class

i did buy the dvd soon as i could. you could too
or take a look instead at mirek’s better preview above
past that, david goncalve’s accurate, full version below, in portuguese subtitles

upcoming 24 hrs of reality

the road forward, per climate reality project

watch with us next week

stand up with us
demand real solutions to the climate crisis

when world comes together – ALL
sure no challenge we can’t overcome !

panama’s indigenous using drones to save their rainforest

. . . and for these ma-pix always we’ve been needing
( from me too  . . . soon )

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation by david iaconangelo, staff christian science monitor, 6/11/16

drones becoming increasingly important tool in combating deforestation
by david iaconangelo, staff
christian science monitor, 6/11/16

 

In Panama, indigenous tribes are turning to a modern tool to help protect their homes: drones.

Vast rainforests, which once covered more than half of Panama’s land surface, are shrinking – eaten away by development, both official and unofficial. Forest land is becoming mines, hydroelectric projects, farmland, cattle habitat, and the site of illegal logging.

In response, seven indigenous tribes, whose members live in autonomous zones known as comarcas, have begun sending up drones to keep an eye on their forests.

Three members from each tribe received a month of training on how to use the drones, REUTERS REPORTS. That included FLIGHT PLAN DESIGN, ASSEMBLY, MANEUVERING, and image processing, reports the UN’s Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Indigenous groups are running the program in conjunction with the Panamanian environmental authority, the Rainforest Foundation, and the FAO, a UN anti-deforestation program.

The FAO believes the program will help tribes monitor watersheds, crop harvests, and forest fires by taking high-resolution images, among other data, that identify deforestation and other negative changes to forest cover.

“These tools enable us to better know the forests’ characteristics and resources we have in our territories,” said Eliseo Quintero, a representative of the Ngäbe-Buglé tribe, in a statement to Reuters.

The Ngöbe-Buglé comarca, located in the western part of Panama, is both the country’s largest comarca and one of the two most affected by deforestation, along with Darien province along the border with Colombia.

The drones have proven especially helpful in monitoring areas where manpower is limited and the rainforest is vast. Last May, NPR reported that a Peruvian conservation group was using drones TO SURVEY AND TAKE PICTURES OF A 145,000-MILE SWATH of the Amazon that had come under pressure from illegal loggers and miners.

Drones have fought deforestation another way, too: planting trees.

The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR’S KEVIN TRUONG reported in September that the group BioCarbon Engineering, led by a NASA engineer, was using drones “in the entire three-step planting method. First, using mapping software to create accurate imaging of the prospective planting area. Second, actually planting the trees. And third, going back to monitor the progress and growth of their technological handiwork.”

And it’s not a minute too soon. Panama LOSES ABOUT 50,000 ACRES (50,000 hectares) of rainforest annually, estimates ANCON, a Panamanian conservation association, while some 2 million hectares of land and water resources – an area the size of New Jersey – is degraded each year. Reforestation efforts have yielded about 75,000 hectares of secondary growth.

Deforestation hurts the economy, too. In a 2014 study, THE UN ESTIMATED that the damage to rainforest from 1999-2012 cost Panama about $3.7 million, adding that better stewardship could create jobs while producing more food and preserving watersheds and other natural resources.

Rosilena Lindo, head of the Climate Change Unit of the Ministry of Environment of Panama, called the drone monitoring system “part of our country’s commitment to address the adverse effects of climate change.”

She said the country hopes to increase the carbon absorption capacity of its forests by at least 10 percent, or more with international financial support.

paris dispatch 7

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Dear Jim,

The endgame approaches. Negotiators at the UN climate talks in Paris now have just hours left to find a global consensus on a new climate change deal. Despite the REMAINING STICKING POINTS the mood is still upbeat for a deal. The UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon said on Friday that he was “ENCOURAGED” BY PROGRESS.

” I have been attending many difficult multilateral negotiations, but by any standard, this negotiation is most complicated, most difficult, but most important for humanity . . . I am urging and appealing to all the state parties to take the final decision for humanity. ”

Our team of reporters at the summit are feeding into a live blog which will run throughout today. You can READ LIVE UPDATES HERE.

Yours Sincerely,
James Randerson, assistant national news editor

Friday’s reading list:

*__PARIS DEAL IS ‘CLOSE TO THE LINE’ BUT TALKS SET TO OVERRUN

*__NEW DRAFT TEXT OF THE DEAL CUTS THROUGH KEY STICKING POINTS

*__VIDEO: THE AMAZONIAN TRIBESPEOPLE WHO SAILED DOWN THE SEINE

*__PODCAST: CLIMATE TALKS TURN UP THE HEAT ON WORLD LEADERS

 

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