ok, let’s give it another scientific look

. . . more & more, older & older, closer & closer

 ( want these links ? sorry –
now get to GUARDIAN’S OWN COMMERCIAL LOADED SITE  )

all began with rachel

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

silent spring here in warm winter
last night, saw it all from beginning
so much more than i ever thought

if about time, sure is here & now
( try it – if not there at her pix, try a click here – )
2-HR PBS AMERICAN EXPERIENCE SILENT SPRING

thanks again rachel

our kids swallow red

hopefully growing greener
thank you, al gore +

my first climate reality project presentation
south east volusia aububon society ( sevas )
12/8/16, new smyrna beach FL

past these elections . . .

. . . before the flood

thanks moving-leo for reminding us
what’s going on beyond today’s voting triffles
to what’s here & ahead – planetwise

” Before the Flood, directed by Fisher Stevens, captures a three-year personal journey alongside Academy Award-winning actor and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio as he interviews individuals from every facet of society in both developing and developed nations who provide unique, impassioned and pragmatic views on what must be done today and in the future to prevent catastrophic disruption of life on our planet. ” ( National Geographic )

what’s left of us who worry most, act less

. . . A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, found that even members of the public who are “alarmed” about a warming planet show relatively low levels of public-sphere action, such as volunteering or protesting. The paper then sought to get to the bottom of why that is, investigating “what drives public actions of the certain segment of the population that’s already really concerned about climate change,” said Kathryn Doherty, a research associate at the Social and Environmental Research Institute in Massachusetts and lead author of the paper.

Why even the people who worry the most about climate change often take little action, Chelsea Harvey, May 16, 2016, The Washington Post, Energy and Environment

*   *   *

( my return note yesterday . . . )

thanks seri & wash post – that’s where i am too

nearby activist friend john of clearly charged living
must also be asking that of me

ok, these goings on of my own don’t take me there
yet some do keep me chasing what to do for our ma

this retirement age – these final days
free at last, oh so happy keeping it so simple

plugged into earth’s sensitivity
what can be this beautiful, so very natural !

then too, what to do if wife & me really could ?
yes, live so in public – join an ecovillage

meantime every roadtime’s loaded with bumps
” why am i pumping so much carbon too ? ”

that’s when a cool intellect starts its message
” simply member of a culture; not your fault ”

get them to do it first, as naomi’s been showing
tax those fossil fuels for all the mess they’re giving us

meantime am doing what i can to spread the word
. . . compost too

that’s about it
not that much here either, wash post

tho at least this, an old familiar thing –
admitting as much of ME before saying so of OTHERS

~ jim rucquoi
shemovesme.com

bernieporch3-10H72FS

beauty & disobedience

. . . much less than one month apart
for sure – ma does need us bigtime

one of the best action movies of our time
do take a look

together at last, host tells us what’s up

paris climate summit: huge stakes, deep divides

eiffel-tower7W150F

agence france-presse, 11/22/2015

Still reeling from the worst terrorist attacks in French history, Paris will host nearly 140 world leaders gathering next week to spearhead a climate pact tasked with keeping Earth liveable for humanity.

US President Barack Obama on Sunday urged others to follow his example and come to the French capital to show that “a handful of killers does not stop the world from doing vital business.”

No heads of state or government backed out of the November 30 opening after jihadist assaults killed 130 people just over a week ago, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said on Saturday.

“On the contrary, some who had not yet responded have said they will come exactly because we cannot give in to terrorism,” he said.

Preoccupied by a recent spate of extremist attacks around the globe, world leaders will have their work cut out for them at the 12-day climate huddle.

The highly-anticipated conference is tasked with fixing a problem that threatens the very well-being of our species: global warming.

After six years of preparatory negotiations, the 195 nations gathering under the UN flag remain sharply divided on a raft of intertwined issues.

There are at least three battlegrounds where the talks could stumble. As always, the first is money.

In Copenhagen in 2009 — the last time countries sought to craft a universal climate pact and failed — it was agreed that poorer nations vulnerable to global warming impacts would receive $100 billion (94 billion euros) per year from 2020.

The money is to help them give up fossil fuels, and to shore up defences against climate-driven food scarcity, heat waves and storm damage.

International climate finance has grown steadily, reaching $62 billion in 2014, according to an estimate commissioned by the UN.

But developing nations want assurances that the flow of money will be recession-proof, come from public sources, and be earmarked for boosting resilience.

India’s environment and climate minister Prakash Javadekar told the Business Standard last week that “predictable, scalable and new finance” is a redline issue.

Along with many other developing countries, New Delhi’s pledge to engineer a massive switch to renewable energy is conditional on such aid.

Some 50 nations — home to a billion people — federated in the Climate Vulnerable Forum, meanwhile, are also pushing for funds for “loss and damage” from climate change impacts that can no longer be avoided.

Rich nations are willing to discuss the issue, but have drawn a line in the sand.

“The notion of so-called compensation or liability… is not a legitimate concept in this context and we would certainly not accept it in the agreement,” a US official told journalists in Paris ahead of the summit.

A second thorny issue is defining a long-term goal.

All nations have embraced the target of capping global warming at two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over pre-industrial levels. The world has already warmed 1 C.

Some 170 nations accounting for more than 90 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas output have filed carbon-cutting plans ahead of the Paris meeting.

But these voluntary commitments are not enough to get the job done, and place Earth on a dangerous 3 C trajectory.

There is no prospect of enhanced pledges right now.

“At this point, our goal will not change,” China’s climate negotiator, Xie Zhenhua, said last week. Other countries, including the United States, have said the same.

The challenge — and the yardstick for success in Paris — will be to agree on an action plan that eliminates the gap over time.

That could mean periodic reviews of national plans to ratchet up emissions reduction efforts.

But countries do not agree on how often reviews must be done, or an in-built obligation to ramp up carbon-cutting efforts.

A third sticking point is the agreement’s legal status.

The United States has consistently said it will not inscribe its emissions reduction targets — 26-28 percent from 2005 levels by 2025 — in a legally-binding international treaty.

At the same time, host country France has said the outcome must have legal force.

There has been some progress since Copenhagen, based on growing scientific evidence of the threat we face, and renewable energy becoming cheaper.

“We have stronger convergence on the broad contours of an agreement than we ever saw ahead of the Copenhagen conference,” said veteran climate analyst Elliot Diringer.

Still, finding middle ground will be tricky, and the planet will be watching.

Some 6,000 journalists have sought accreditation for the 12-day meeting, twice as many as can be accommodated.

Civil society groups, however, have been left out in the cold.

France, citing security fears, has cancelled mass rallies to press for urgent political action planned for November 29 and December 12 in Paris.

copyright 2015, agence france-presse

. . . so what can i do ?

HAVE A SAY & DO YOURSELF, PER LONGTIME ACTIVIST PAGES